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Entries found for search: sampling

in-position sampling : A technique for miking drum kits which uses two matched microphones in an X-Y arrangement, typically using large-diaphragm, condenser-type microphones. The main focus of in-position sampling is preserving the stereo spread: Most two-channstereo spread of the kit and producing a punchy drum sound.

sampling error : See jitter and aliasing.

sampling rate : The rate at which PAM samples of an analog signal are encoded by a digital device. The higher the sampling rate during the encoding process, the greater the spectral bandwidth of signal it is able to record accurately. Typical sampling rates vary from 11kHz to 96kHz. The sampling rate for CDs is 44.1kHz. See sampling, Nyquist frequency. Sampling rates can be changed via a sampling rate converter, when the process is known as resampling.

sampling : The process of encoding an analog signal in digital form by reading (sampling) its level at precisely spaced intervals of time. See sample, sampling rate.

resampling : (1) The process of sampling a previously mixed sample to create a new sample. (2) The changing of a signal encoded at one sampling rate to a different sampling rate via a resampling converter.

oversampling : The principle of sampling a signal at an integer multiple of the normal sampling rate. The factor can be as little as two times, or much more. The effect is to distribute a fixed level of quantization noise over an ultrasonic frequency range, diluting the noise in the audio bandwidth and improving the S/N ratio. See also quantization error, Shannon’s channel capacity theorem.

one-shot sampling : A sound which is sampled once and then triggered as necessary.

Oversampling method used in a CD player to reproduce digital information as faithfully as possible in analogue form, a part of the digital to analogue conversion process.



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