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Entries found for search: sync

asynchronous : Not according to a fixed rate of repetition. An asynchronous signal can occur at intervals which do not necessarily coincide with a fixed-rate system or master clock pulse.

continuous sync : A software feature where the DAW will create a new clock based on incoming SMPTE timecodetime code to enable recording to the DAW from an ATR. The result is that the sample rate of the DAW will vary continuously, effectively speeding up and slowing down to track the timecodetime code variations. Continuous sync requires dedicated hardware, and may not be available on all DAWS. For example, ProTools™ has a feature for continuous sync which is necessary when syncing continuously to an ATR while recording on any digital machine as the SMPTE timecodetime code-based clock is not guaranteed to be at the precise sampling rate. The ProTools Slave Driver™ does the sample rate conversion in the ProTools hardware so that the audio quality of the digital data isnít compromised.

crystal sync : A system for generating a sync signal that will ensure proper synchronization of film footage and its corresponding sync sound without using any sync reference, such as 60Hz AC line frequency. Two piezoelectric crystals, each tuned to the same high frequency, are installed in the camera and recorder. The crystal in the camera precisely controls the motor speed during shooting. The crystal in the recorder produces a pilot tone that is recorded on tape in the same way which the camera motor speed would be recorded through the conventional sync cable. Because the two crystals are tuned identically, the dailies, when synched with the magnetic film copy of the original sound takes, will maintain perfect sync once the slate marks are aligned. Crystal sync generators are also installed in portable video cameras and VTRs. See Nagra, neo-pilot.

editorial sync : Alignment of picture and soundtracksound tracks such that their start marks are equal numbers of frames prior to the first frames of picture and sound, respectively. See projection sync.

sync word : At the end of every 80-bit SMPTE timecode word is a 16-bit sync word. The sync word provides direction and sync-lock speed information, and marks the end of each timecode word. The bits are: 0011 1111 1111 1101.

FM sync : The 13.5kHz frequency-modulated sync pulse recorded on Nagra IV-S recorders.

house sync : An internal master timing reference used to synchronize all tra nsports within a facility.Also called black-burst.

jam sync : A family of techniques in which a synchronization device reads timecodetime code and regenerates new timecodetime code that may not have the same address as the original timecode. Usually, the transferring of a timecodetime code and user bits from an external reference source to a SMPTE timecodetime code generator, either once, called one-time jam sync, which will align two codes at one frame only, allowing each to proceed at its own internal rate froorm that moment forward, or continuously, which will force the generator to mimic the timecodecode numbers of the reference source continuously. TimecodeTime code is read up to the last good address, then the generator uses the next consecutive address to generate a new timecodetime code, called Jam TimecodeTime Code, or JTC. The process of regenerating SMPTE timecodetime code to a previous reference: the source timecodetime code goes to the timecodetime code synchronizer, which reads it and regenerates a new copy. If there is a dropout in the timecodetime code, the synchronizer will freewheel, continuing to create timecodetime code to cover the dropout. Used to recover from dropouts or non-continuous timecodetime code caused by editing.

lip sync : The process of matching dialog sound to the picture. See ADR.

Magnasync/Magnatech : Two brands of mag dubber sprocketed tape recorders or playback machines. They can be used to transfer a sound source onto magnetic film. These brand names are also used generically to indicate any sprocketed tape recorder or playback unit. See dubberr.

See house sync, self null

MIDI Sync : One of the synchronization protocols supported by MIDI, either MIDI Clock or MTC.

stage sync : How well in sync the Foley or ADR is when it is recorded.

SMPTE sync track : A square wave recorded onto an audio track. Note that this is only possible with digital audio, so for the most reliable results when transferring audio, use jam sync. See also sync track.

smart sync : The ability of some A/D-D/A converters, digital recorders, or other digital devices to automatically sync to word clock.

simul-sync : See sel-sync.

sel-sync or sel synch : Selective synchronization. (1) In a multitrack tape recorder, the use of the record head to replay material from other tracks to be heard by the musicians while they overdub a new track. This is essential for accurate synchronization as the extra few milliseconds afforded by its position will compensate for the inevitable delay if the signal was taken from the main replay head which is some millimeters farther down in the tape stream. When the tracks of a multiple-track tape recording are recorded sequentially, one must listen to the previously recorded tracks while the current one is being recorded. If the standard playback head is used for this, there will be a time delay between the tracks when played back because of the physical distance between the recording and playback heads in the machine. To solve the problem, the record heads of the previously recorded tracks are used as playback heads while the adjacent tracks are being recorded. Since all the record head tracks are in line, there will be no delay. Also called simul-sync. Ampex has trademarked Sel-Sync,", but other products have similar features. . The replay quality is less good when using the record head for a function for which it was not designed, thus it is important that the recorder returns to monitoring from the main replay head during mixdown. See auto-input. (2) The process of recording new tracks on a multitrack tape while listening to previously recorded tracks via playback through other channels of the record head.(2) On a recorder used for synchronization of sound with motion pictures or videotape, a separate sync head that records and plays the sync tone or other sync signal.

projection sync : The relative location of picture and sound in a motion picture print that produces proper synchronization during projection. In 16mm, answer and release prints are made with the soundtrack advanced 26 frames ahead of the picture. At 24fps, this distance represents over one second of footage. In 35mm, prints are made with the sound advanced 20 frames. Since each frame of picture must be held still while light shines through it, illuminating the screen, and since quality sound can only be read from film moving continuously past an optical or magnetic playback head, the picture frame and sound frame corresponding to the same event on film must be separated by a distance on film that will match the image projection with the sound reproduction. See editorial sync.

post-sync : Post-synchronization. (1) ADR recording with M&E made to synchronize with an existing film or video tape, usually for translation of a foreign-language film. This term is used mainly in Europe, while in the U.S., the term ADR is used as a synonym. (2) The recording of sound tothat be added to the synchronous sound.

phase sync : In SMPTE timecode synchronization, an option by which the slave machine is speed-controlled in such a way that the phase of its bi-modulated sync tonecode wave is held in phase with the sync tonecode wave on the master machine. This provides much closer alignment of the two than just frame lock. However, because the synchronizer must make continuous adjustments to the slaveís speed, phase sync can introduce noticeable flutter when the audio machine is slaved to video. In some synchronizers, only sub-frame information is used to achieve interlock, yielding a 1/100 frame accuracy between machines.

oscillator sync : A sound synthesis technique whereby one oscillatorís cycle is synchronized to that of a second. This forces the waveform of the slave oscillator to restart its cycle each time the master crosses the zero-point. As a result, the fundamental of the slave is the same as the master, but the waveform is radically changed. The pitch of the controlling oscillator is not normally added into the audio mix, but can be shifted by pitch-bend, envelope, aftertouch or an LFO, producing substantial changes to the harmonic content of the slave oscillator, but without changing the fundamental pitch as does ring modulation. Instead, the higher harmonics around the pitch of the slaved oscillator are emphasized, producing a very hard edge to the tone.

sync : Synchronization. (1) The process of time-locking a number of normally independent and free-running systems. Where one of these is a tape recorder, the term tape sync is used: one track of the tape is used to carry a sync track which is used to provide timing for the other devices. Two devices are said to be "in sync" when they are locked together with respect to time, so that the events generated by each of them will always fall into predictable time relationships. See also SMPTE timecode, crystal sync, sel-sync, jam sync. (2) In a synthesizer with two or more oscillators, the ability to lock the frequency of the slave, to a master. This has the effect of eliminating the beating which can occur if one is slightly out of tune with respect to the other. If the slaveís frequency is adjusted higher than the master, there will be no actual change in frequency, but an alteration in the harmonics, giving the composite sound a different timbre. This is most effective if the frequency of the slave is modulated constantly, perhaps with an envelope generator, to produce a distinctive wailing sound. (23) The operating mode of tape recorders that uses the sel-sync process of playback. (3) In a synthesizer with two or more oscillators, the ability to lock the frequency of the slave, to a master. This has the effect of eliminating the beating which can occur if one is slightly out of tune with respect to the other. If the slaveís frequency is adjusted higher than the master, there will be no actual change in frequency, but an alteration in the harmonics, giving the composite sound a different timbre. This is most effective if the frequency of the slave is modulated constantly, perhaps with an envelope generator, to produce a distinctive kind of wailing sound.

sync block : A device used in editing to keep film and sprocketed soundtracksound tracks in sync. It can have two or more gangs of sprocketed wheels that rotate in unison and a counter that displays a feet/footage and frame count from a selected starting point. Also called a synchronizer.

sync head : In a multitrack tape recorder, the use of the record head to replay material from other tracks to be heard by the musicians while they simultaneously record a new track. This is essential for accurate synchronization as the extra few milliseconds afforded by its position will compensate for the inevitable delay if the signal was taken from the main replay head which is some millimeters downstream in the tape stream. The replay quality is less good when using the record head for a function for which it was not designed, thus it is important that the machine returns to monitoring from the main replay head during mixdown. (2) On a recorder used for synchronization of sound with motion pictures or videotape, a separate head that records and plays the synchronizing tone or signal. See sel-sync(2).

synchronization : (1) The precise alignment of picture and sound during projection and playback such that visual and audio events will be reproduced with the same time relationships they had when originally captured to tape. (2) The process by which this is achieved.

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